Domino 10 for Developers

  • Oct 9, 2018

So Domino 10 is upon us, marking the first time in a good while that Domino has had an honest-to-goodness version bump.

More than anything, I think V10 is about that sort of mark. Its primary role in the world is to state "Domino isn't dead" - not exactly coming from a position of strength for the platform, but it's the critical message that HCL has to sell if they're going to be viewed as anything but coroners.

Still, in addition to merely existing, V10 brings some changes that will help developers, particularly those - sadly - maintaining large legacy applications.

DQL

The addition that will have the largest immediate impact on developing codebases is, I think, DQL. I went into a bit of detail on this before and I think that that post is largely accurate, but the general gist of it is that DQL can be thought of as "database.search(...) but good", bringing practical arbitrary queries of non-FT data to Domino.

In its current form, it feels like a long-back-burnered passion project that's implemented in an effective way, bringing some of the benefits of arbitrary queries in SQL and new-era NoSQL databases without having to rewrite NIF or NSF storage.

UpdateAs Karsten Lehmann kindly pointed out, DQL is slated for addition to the LS/Java classes in 10.0.1 at an as-yet-unspecified time.

HTTP Methods in LotusScript

I just let out a heavy sigh after writing that header, but I get why they added these. A lot of Domino developers never left the desiccated-but-comforting embrace of LotusScript or are employed primarily to maintain Notes client apps, where using Java is possible but involves jumping over hurdles.

Network operations have been possible for a long time via OLE (on Windows) or LS2J, and I'm sure I'm not the only one who's had a "Network" LS script library sitting around for over a decade, but having baked-in methods is preferable. Moreover, neither of those mechanisms would work on iOS without a lot of additional work.

This is being billed as enabling all sorts of integrations, which I suppose is strictly true in that it's a bit easier to call HTTP methods in old code now. In practice, I think it will be mostly helpful for the little one-off situations where you have to call some web service to integrate with a product tracking app or the like.

iPad Notes Client

This definitely seems like another back-burner project that was brought to the fore in the HCL transition. They had iOS references in the Mac 64-bit C SDK years ago, and it only makes sense, since the existence of the Mac port at all meant the job was (sort of) half done. It's not out today, but it's logically tied to V10, and they've been expanding a beta over the summer.

Like the additions to LotusScript, it makes sense. I can't imagine that running existing Notes apps on an iPad will be a good experience, but it should be a cheap one, and it'll probably be good enough for at least some cases. They've intimated that there will be affordances in app design to improve the experience specifically for this client, though I don't envy the engineers who have to go in and implement those.

Node.js Support

Dubbed the "App Dev Pack", Node support will be coming in an Upgrade-Pack-like additional download, in the form of a Domino server addon to add a gRPC server combined with a domino-db Node module that I gather is designed to be familiar for Node+MongoDB stack users.

When this intention was first announced, I think that a lot of Domino developers figured it would be like XPages: a new design element or two added to the NSF, plus another runtime crammed into Domino's aging HTTP stack. The other big potential option was essentially a codification of the ExtLib DAS REST services into a wrapper package to be used in standalone Node apps.

The App Dev Pack is more the latter than the former, but the use of gRPC should make it more performant and flexible than just wrapping the existing HTTP services. I'll be curious to see how this shakes out in practice. XPages has been with us for a decade, but it still only captured a slice of the Domino development market, and it carried the advantage of being bundled right into the stack. Node is a very different beast, entirely unlike traditional Domino development, and I'm not sure how many existing Domino developers will make the transition. Ostensibly, one of the main benefits is to also attract new blood, which - well, maybe.

Having this is much better than not, and the notion of having a new RPC connection that doesn't have the local runtime requirements of NRPC is tantalizing.

Overall

Overall, this release definitely feels like a very pragmatic release. Just by virtue of its existence, it covers the base of "Domino isn't dead" in a way that's much better than the older mealy-mouthed messaging of "well, we don't have specific plans to cancel it". Additionally, though, the fact that most of the developer-facing improvements are for "old world" design elements is an acknowledgement that XPages didn't capture the Domino development world (and, probably, that HCL didn't hire the XPages team). The prospect of the community crawling back into the LotusScript cradle isn't great, but there's no avoiding the fact that there are a great many developers who never had a reason to do anything different. Not many cost-cutting IT departments let their developers re-learn their entire skillset when other departments are just asking for a new button on a form.

In an alternate universe, this would have made for a fine "Domino 9.5" release, but the wringer that the 9.0.1 era put us through demanded a full major version bump. I'll be curious to see how Domino 11 and so on shape up. If the "not dead" push works and it turns Domino's fortunes in the market around at all, it would give HCL room to turn it into a real platform again. That's a big "if", since it's a lot easier to get existing Domino developers excited than it is to get IT purchasers to sign the licensing checks, but time will tell.